click here for teachings on the daily Gospel readings   

Other Sunday and Holy Day Readings

FEAST OF THE PRESENTATION OF THE LORD (February 2)

Readings:
Malachi 3:1-4
Psalm 24:7-10
Hebrews 2:14-18
Luke 2:22-40

All Scripture passages are from the New American Bible unless designated NJB (New Jerusalem Bible), IBHE (Interlinear Bible Hebrew-English), IBGE (Interlinear Bible Greek-English), or LXX (Greek Septuagint Old Testament translation).  CCC designates a citation from the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The word LORD or GOD rendered in all capital letters is, in the Hebrew text, God's Divine Name YHWH (Yahweh).

The Theme of this Feast's Readings: Jesus Christ ~ God's Presence among His People
It is forty days since the birth of Jesus on December the 25th (with the 25th counting as day #1 as the ancients counted without the concept of 0-place value).  According to the Law of the Sinai Covenant, a woman of the covenant must present herself at the Jerusalem Temple for ritual purification forty days after the birth of a boy child (Lev 12:2-4, 6-8).  The mother needed to be purified before resuming worship in the Temple; and if the child was a firstborn son, he had to be "redeemed" according to the Law (Ex 12:12, 14-15; Num 18:15-16).  It was not necessary that Jesus' redemption take place at the Temple, but Joseph and Mary chose to redeem Jesus at the same time Mary was purified and presented her sin sacrifice.  This is the first cultic act of God the Son in the holy city.  It was the beginning of the fulfillment of prophecy and the starting point of Jesus' mission to fulfill the ordinances of the old Law that will climax in His last visit to Jerusalem when He will offer Himself in sacrifice to purify and redeem Israel and all mankind.

The First Reading Malachi 3:1-4 ~ The Lord Purifies His People
1 Thus says the Lord God: Lo, I am sending my messenger to prepare the way before me; and suddenly there will come to the Temple the LORD whom you seek, and the messenger of the covenant whom you desire.  Yes, he is coming, says the LORD of hosts [Yahweh Sabaoth].  2 But who will endure the day of his coming? And who can stand when he appears?  For he is like the refiner's fire, or like the fuller's lye.  3 He will sit refining and purifying silver, and he will purify the sons of Levi, refining them like gold or like silver that they may offer due sacrifice to the LORD.  4 Then the sacrifice of Judah and Jerusalem will please the LORD, as in the days of old, as in years gone by. 

The word malachi means "my messenger" in Hebrew.  Malachi was Israel's last Old Covenant prophet before the birth of St. John the Baptist, and the Book of Malachi is the last Bible book before the beginning of the New Testament.  Malachi was God's prophet to the Jews who had returned after the Babylonian exile in the 6th century BC.  The book was probably written after the Temple in Jerusalem was rebuilt in 516 BC but before the religious reforms under Nehemiah in 445 BC.  There are three main themes addressed by the prophet:

  1. The failures of the priests in their religious duties (Mal 1:6-2:9).
  2. The failures of the covenant people to be obedient to their covenant promises (Mal 3:6-12).
  3. The warning that these covenant failures will result in the "Day of Yahweh": a day of divine judgment when God Himself will come to purify the priesthood, consume the wicked, and secure justice for the righteous so that right worship may again be established (Mal 3:1-5, 13-23).

Malachi 3:3-4 ~  He will sit refining and purifying silver, and he will purify the sons of Levi, refining them like gold or like silver that they may offer due sacrifice to the LORD. 4 Then the sacrifice of Judah and Jerusalem will please the LORD, as in the days of old, as in years gone by. 
"Judah" is the covenant people and the Temple in Jerusalem was the center of covenant worship.  When the Lord comes to restore the covenant (verse 1), to purify the priesthood and the covenant people, He will also re-establish right sacrifice and worship that is pleasing to God.

Christians see this prophecy being fulfilled in Jesus Christ.  Jesus Himself will identify the first "messenger," the one who prepares the way in the spirit of Elijah (Mal 3:1, 23), as St. John the Baptist (Mt 11:7-15; 17:10-13; Mk 9:11-13; Lk 7:24-30).  This identification makes Jesus the "Lord who you seek" who will "come to His Temple" (Mal 3:1a).  Jesus is also the "messenger" (or mediator) who establishes a "covenant" (Mal 3:1b; Mt 26:28; Mk 14:24; Lk 22:20; 1 Cor 11:25; Heb 7:22; 8:6-7, 13; 9:15) and who offers a "due sacrifice to the Lord" on the altar of the Cross.  His sacrifice will purify and restore the new Israel of the Kingdom of Jesus Christ which is the Church (CCC 877).  He will establish a new priesthood to offer His sacrifice and right worship that will please God (verses 3-4).  And Jesus is the One who will return in His Second Advent to judge the living and the dead on the great and terrible "Day of Yahweh" (Mal 3:1c-3; 19-21; Jn 5:22-27; Acts 10:42; 17:30-31; 1 Thes 4:13-5:10; 2 Tim 4:1; 1 Pt 4:5). 

Also see references to the Day of Yahweh's judgment in the New Testament in Mt 16:27; 25:31-46; Jn 5:28-30; Acts 13:34-25; 2 Thes 1:6-10; Rev 6:17.  For the fire as a symbol of judgment on the "Day of Yahweh" see for example Is 10:16-19; 30:27; Jer 21:14; Amos 5:18; Zeph 1:3, 18; 3:8; Mal 3:19 in the Old Testament, and see fire as a symbol of judgment in the New Testament in St. John the Baptist's warning in Mt 3:19; Jesus' statements in Mt 13:41-43, 49-50; by St. Paul in  2 Thes 1:8; and in the Book of Revelation in Rev 8:12; 14:25-16; 21:8.

Responsorial Psalm 24:7-10 ~ An Encounter with the LORD in the Temple where He is the King of glory
The response is: "Who is the king of glory; it is the Lord!"
7Lift up, O gates, your lintels; reach up, you ancient portals, that the king of glory may come in!
8 Who is this king of glory?  The LORD, strong and mighty, the LORD, mighty in battle.
9 Lift up, O gates, your lintels; reach up, you ancient portals, that the king of glory may come in!
10 Who is this king of glory?  The LORD of hosts [Yahweh Sabaoth]; he is the king of glory.

This psalm was sung for a solemn procession upon the Ark of the Covenant's entry into the precincts of the Temple.  At the end of Psalm 23, the psalmist expressed the desire "to dwell in the house of the Lord forever (Ps 23:6).  In this psalm he comes to the Temple gates as God (or His Ark carried in procession) arrives to enter His Temple.  Poetically the psalmist suggests that the lintels of the gates are too low and the gates to narrow to receive the majesty of the Lord, and so the psalmist tells them to "reach up" that the King may enter in (verses 7-8).  Then the rhetorical question is asked: "Who is this king of glory? (verse 10).  Those in the procession respond: "Yahweh Sabaoth; He is the King of glory!" using a title of God that suggests His divine kingship and awesome power over the forces of nature and the cosmos, the warrior God who defends His people (verse 8).

When reading or reciting this psalm, a Christian cannot help but think of Jesus' triumphal ride into the holy city of Jerusalem and His entry into the Temple on Palm Sunday, the 10th of Nisan in 30 AD (Mt 11:1-11; Mk 11:7-11; Lk 19:35-38; Jn 12:12-15).  In the liturgy of the Church, the psalm is also symbolic of those pure souls who have reached the gates of the heavenly Jerusalem, and therefore it is recited on the Feast of All Saints.

St. Ambrose applied verses 7 and 9 to God's entry into the soul of the Christian, which then becomes the Temple of the Holy Spirit: "The soul, then, has a door; the doors of which the psalm speaks are to be found within us: Lift up your heads, O gates!  And be lifted up, O ancient doors! That the King of glory may come in.  If you take care to raise the lintel of your faith, the King of glory will enter into you, carrying with him the triumph of his passion.  That the victory, too, has its doors, for we read in the psalm words spoken by the Lord Jesus through the mouth of the psalmist: Open up to me the gates of victory.  We know, moreover, that the soul has its gate, the one to which Christ comes, and where he stands and knocks.  Open up, then, for he wishes to come in; he wants to find his Bride waiting for him" (Expositio psalmi, 118.14).

The Second Reading Hebrews 2:14-18 ~ Perfection and glory through suffering and Resurrection
14 Since all the children share the same human nature, he too shared equally in it, so that by his death he could set aside him who held the power of death, namely the devil, 15 and set free all those who had been held in slavery all their lives by the fear of death.  16 For it was not the angels that he took to himself; he took to himself the line [literally = seed] of Abraham.  17 It was essential that he should in this way be made completely like his brothers so that he could become a compassionate and trustworthy high priest for their relationship to God, able to expiate the sins of the people.  18 For the suffering he himself passed through while being put to the test enables him to help others when they are being put to the test.

God chose to save humanity through assuming human nature in the Incarnation of God the Son who became a man born of a woman from the line of the promised "seed" of Abraham (Mt 1:1).  In the covenant formed with Abraham and his descendants, Yahweh promised that all mankind would be blessed through him (see Gen 12:3; 18:18; 22:18; 26:4; 28:14; Sir 44:19-21; Acts 3:25; Gal 3:8, 14).  This promise is fulfilled in the Passion, Resurrection, and Ascension of the descendant of Abraham who is God enfleshed, Jesus of Nazareth: Abraham, the great ancestor of a host of nations, no one was ever his equal in glory.  He observed the Law of the Most High, and entered into a covenant with him.  He confirmed the covenant in his own flesh, and proved himself faithful under ordeal.  The Lord therefore promised him on oath to bless the nations through his descendants... (Sir 44:19-21).  St. Paul calls all Christians the heirs of Christ and the true descendants of Abraham (Gal 3:29)

Jesus' perfect sacrifice has set free all men and women of all ages who were held captive by sin and death (CCC 633; 1 Pt 3:18-20; 4:6).  Because He has gained victory over both sin and death, those who believe in Him have the power to share in His triumph and receive the glory God intended for man as promised.  It is what the Fathers of the Church called the "divine exchange" in which God became man so man could be infused with the life of the Trinity through Christian baptism.

Hebrews 2:14-15 and verses 17-18 stress Christ's union with humanity in His flesh and blood.  It is in offering the perfect sacrifice of His human flesh and blood that He conquered the devil and set humanity free from the fear of death.  St Paul wrote: Then as one man's trespass led to condemnation for all men, so one man's act of righteousness leads to acquittal and life for all men (Rom 5:18). Through His death and Resurrection, Jesus has set humanity free.  The promised resurrection of all Christians is intimately connected to the Resurrection of Jesus Christ (Rom 6:5; 1 Cor 6:14; 15:20; 2 Cor 4:14; 13:4; Eph 2:6; Col 1:18; 2:12; 1 Thes 4:14; 2 Tim 2:11).  We have the promise of our own bodily resurrection at the end of time.  It is a guarantee He has given to all believers, and as we await His Second Coming and the fulfillment of that promise, we have already been prepared for that promise by being given new life as sons and daughters of God through the Sacrament of Baptism and being incorporated into the Body of the risen Christ by faith and the Eucharist.

The final statement of Jesus' superiority over the angels in verse 16 is that only Jesus Christ has the power to redeem mankind; no angel has that power (also see earlier statements of Jesus' superiority over angels in Heb 1:4-14).  It is a redemption He accomplished by becoming a man from the seed of the prophet Abraham and fulfilling the promise of a world-wide blessing, bringing  universal salvation to those who accepted God's gift of grace through Christ Jesus. 

Hebrews 2:17-18 the inspired writer says: 17 It was essential that he should in this way be made completely like his brothers so that he could become a compassionate and trustworthy high priest for their relationship to God, able to expiate the sins of the people.  18 For the suffering he himself passed through while being put to the test enables him to help others when they are being put to the test.
There are essentially 3 reasons why this plan was necessary (see Mt 16:24; Lk 24:26-27; 44-45; 1 Pt 1:10-12; 2:21; Rom 3:25-26; CCC# 612; 614-15; 618).

  1. That the Son should become a man to suffer for men was the plan God set in motion from the beginning, and through the prophets God revealed the plan.  Jesus told the disciples on the road to Emmaus, Was it not necessary that the Christ should suffer before entering into his glory?  Then, starting with Moses and going through all the prophets, he explained to them the passages throughout the Scriptures that were about himself  (for example see Dt 18:17-20; Is 52:13-53:12; Ez 34:11-24; Dan 7:13-14; Zec 9:11-17; etc.).
  2. Justice was served through the death of the man Jesus in atonement for the accumulated sins of humanity: God appointed him as a sacrifice for reconciliation, through faith, by the shedding of his blood, and so showed his justness; first for the past, when sins went unpunished because he held his hand; and now again for the present age, to show how he is just and justifies everyone who has faith in Jesus (Rom 3:25-26).
  3.  But also, for Jesus to be the definitive covenant mediator, humanity's representative to God, He best serves that role having lived and died as a man Himself so that no human being can claim that God does not understand human suffering and human longing for restoration and peace: For the suffering he himself passed through while being put to the test enables him to help others when they are being put to the test. And He has left an example for us to follow; it is an example of perfect self-sacrificial love.  This love is the healing salve for a wounded world in which we are called to love as He loved: He calls his disciples to "take up [their] cross and follow [him]," for "Christ also suffered for [us], leaving [us] an example so that [we] should follow in his steps" (CCC# 618 quoting Mt 16:24 and 1 Pt 2:21).

None of us can complain to God when we face physical suffering or emotional suffering that God cannot understand our sufferings because Jesus endured all we could ever experience.  And He has promised if we unite our sufferings to His that our sufferings are not without value and can be applied toward penance for our sins and contribute to our salvation (see Mt 10:38; 16:24; Mk 8:34; Lk 14:27; Rom 8:17; Council of Trent: DS 1690, CCC 618, 1460).

The Gospel of Luke 2:22-40 ~ The Presentation of Baby Jesus at the Jerusalem Temple
22 When the days were completed for their purification according to the law of Moses, they took him up to Jerusalem to represent him to the Lord, 23 just as it is written in the law of the Lord, "Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord," 24 and to offer the sacrifice of "a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons," in accordance with the dictate in the law of the Lord.   25 Now there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon.  This man was righteous and devout, awaiting the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was upon him.  26 It had been revealed to him that he should not see death before he had seen the Messiah of the Lord.  27 He came in the Spirit into the Temple; and when the parents brought in the child Jesus to perform the custom of the law in regard to him, 28 he took him into his arms and blessed God, saying: 29 "Now, Master, you may let your servant go in peace, according to your word, 30 for my eyes have seen your salvation, 31 which you prepared in sight of all the peoples, 32 a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and glory for your people Israel." 33 The child's father and mother were amazed at what was said about him; 34 and Simeon blessed them and said to Mary his mother, "Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted 35 (and you yourself a sword will pierce) so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed."  36 There was also a prophetess, Anna, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher.  She was advanced in years, having lived seven years with her husband after her marriage, 37 and then as a widow until she was eighty-four.  She never left the Temple, but worshiped night and day with fasting and prayer.  38 And coming forward at that very time, she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were awaiting the redemption of Jerusalem. 39 When they had fulfilled all the prescriptions of the law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee, to their own town of Nazareth.  40 The child grew and became strong, filled with wisdom and the favor of God was upon him.

Jesus coming with Joseph and Mary to the Temple can be seen as a fulfillment of Malachi 3:1b: And suddenly there will come to the Temple the LORD whom you seek ... The circumcision and naming in verse 21 is another link to the narrative of St. John's birth and more evidence of the obedience of Mary and Joseph, just as Elizabeth and Zechariah were obedient in the naming of their child.

Luke 2:22-23 When the days were completed for their purification according to the law of Moses, they took him up to Jerusalem to represent him to the Lord, 23 just as it is written in the law of the Lord, "Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated to the Lord..." (underlining added).
Women who gave birth to male children were required to observe forty days of ritual confinement after which they were to present themselves at the Temple for purification: The LORD said to Moses, "Tell the Israelites: When a woman has conceived and gives birth to a boy, she shall be unclean for seven days, with the same uncleanness as at her menstrual period.  On the eighth day, the flesh of the boy's foreskin shall be circumcised, and then she shall spend thirty-three days more in becoming purified of her blood; she shall not touch anything sacred nor enter the sanctuary until the days of her purification are fulfilled (Lev 12:1-4). 

When the period of purification was completed, new mother went to the Temple of Yahweh in the holy city of Jerusalem.  She bathed in the Temple ritual purification pool (mikvah) and presented a whole burnt offering and a sin sacrifice to the Lord (Lev 12:6-7).  If the child was a firstborn male, the woman was required to dedicate him to God: "Every male that opens the womb shall be consecrated [or holy] to the Lord," as Luke quotes in verse 23 from Exodus 13:2.  This is just one of the ways in which the prophecy of the angel Gabriel is fulfilled when he told Mary her Son would be called "holy" in Luke 1:35.  Mary and Joseph, with the forty day old baby Jesus, journeyed the c. five miles from Bethlehem (located south of Jerusalem on the east ridge of the mountain watershed) up the mountain to Jerusalem, situated on a ridge about 2400 miles above sea level. 

Luke 2:24 ... and to offer the sacrifice of "a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons," in accordance with the dictate in the law of the Lord
Luke will use the term "law of the Lord" or "Law of Moses" nine times in the Greek text; five of those times appear in this chapter ( Lk 2:22, 23, 24, 27, 39; 10:26; 16:16-17; 24:44). The sacrifice of two turtle doves or two young pigeons instead of a lamb identifies the Holy Family's humble station; it was the sacrifice of the poor (see Lev 12:6-8).

Luke 2:25-38 ~ The prophetic statements of the Prophet Simeon
25 Now there was a man in Jerusalem whose name was Simeon.  This man was righteous and devout, awaiting the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was upon him.  26 It had been revealed to him that he should not see death before he had seen the Messiah of the Lord.  27 He came in the Spirit into the Temple; and when the parents brought in the child Jesus to perform the custom of the law in regard to him, 28 he took him into his arms and blessed God, saying: 29 "Now, Master, you may let your servant go in peace, according to your word, 30 for my eyes have seen your salvation, 31 which you prepared in sight of all the peoples, 32 a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and glory for your people Israel." 33 The child's father and mother were amazed at what was said about him; 34 and Simeon blessed them and said to Mary his mother, "Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted 35 (and you yourself a sword will pierce) so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed." 
St. Luke describes Simeon in three ways: he is "righteous", "devout", and "expectant."  Expectant means he was actively awaiting the coming of the Messiah.  Like Zechariah and Elizabeth, Simeon is described as "righteous" and he is also described as "devout."  Luke defined "righteous" as "observing all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord blamelessly" (Lk 1:6) and "devout" in the same way as "a devout observer of the Law (Acts 22:12).  Simeon is a prophet and his part in the infancy narrative is prophetic.

St. Luke also describes the role of God's Spirit in Simeon's life:

  1. He has the Spirit upon him (verse 25)
  2. He receives revelations from the Spirit (verse 26)
  3. He comes to the Temple "in the Spirit" (verse 27)

Luke 2:28-32 ~ ... he took him into his arms and blessed God, saying: 29 "Now, Master, you may let your servant go in peace, according to your word, 30 for my eyes have seen your salvation, 31 which you prepared in sight of all the peoples, 32 a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and glory for your people Israel."
The Holy Family was in the outer court when Simeon approached them.  St. Luke uses the Greek term hieron, which includes the whole of the outer Temple complex but not the inner courts and Sanctuary (naos = Holy Place and Holy of Holies) that is accessible only to priests.  An ritually pure covenant members, including a woman, could enter the inner courts and the courtyard (Court of the Priests) where the altar of sacrifice stood only if offering a sacrifice.  Otherwise a woman stood in the Court of Woman and a man in the Court of Israel during the liturgical worship service.  Gentiles were forbidden to enter the inner courts and stood in the outer "Court of the Gentiles."  Simeon and Anna may have been in the outer "Porch of Solomon" where teaching usually took place (Acts 3:11; 5:12).

Simeon's prayer of praise is called in Latin the Nunc Dimittis.  The prayer is divided into two parts and is followed by a prophecy for Mary:

  1. The fulfillment of God's promise to Simeon
  2. The prophecy of a universal salvation

Having been told that he will live until he has seen the Messiah, Simeon now identifies Jesus as the promised Redeemer-Messiah not just for Israel but for all nations, proclaiming a universal message of salvation.  Addressing God and using the prophetic language of Isaiah 42:6 and 49:6 from the "Song of the Servant" passages, it is the child Jesus who Simeon identifies as "your salvation."  This declaration may also suggest wordplay on Jesus' name: "Yahweh is salvation."

Luke 2:33-38 ~ The child's father and mother were amazed at what was said about him; 34 and Simeon blessed them and said to Mary his mother, "Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted 35 and you yourself a sword will pierce so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed."
After blessing Joseph and Mary, Simeon offers a prophecy of opposition and suffering for Mary,
Simeon's prophecy concerning Jesus is ominous: ... this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted.  The child will create opposition and people will be divided over their response to Him.  It is an ominous prediction because the "falling" comes before the "rising."  Simeon has announced the rejection of the Messiah by His own people.  Mary also used the rising and falling imagery in reverse in the Magnificat when she spoke of God lifting up the lowly and throwing down the rulers from their thrones (verse 52).  Jesus will speak of the division over His mission when He says that He did not come to bring peace but division—there can be no middle ground in response to His message (see Mt 10:34-36; Lk 12:51-53).

And then turning to Mary, Simeon said: " ... and you yourself a sword will pierce so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed" (verse 35).
Simeon prophesies that Mary will share in her son's suffering.  The Cross is Jesus' unique sacrifice and is a sacrifice He asks all His disciples to embrace as His partners in the plan of redemption (see Mt 10:38; 16:24; Mk 8:34; Lk 9:23; 14:27). ...Jesus desires to associate with his redeeming sacrifice those who were to be its first beneficiaries.  This is achieved supremely in the case of his mother, who was associated more intimately than any other person in the mystery of his redemptive suffering (CCC 618).  As the embodiment of the "daughter of Zion," Mary will live out the sorrow of her people in their struggle to come to terms with Jesus' mission.  The symbolic mention of the sword may be related to the prophecies in Ezekiel 14:7-8 and Zechariah 12:10.

Luke 2:36-38 ~ The Prophecy of Anna
 There was also a prophetess, Anna, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher.  She was advanced in years, having lived seven years with her husband after her marriage, 37 and then as a widow until she was eighty-four.  She never left the Temple, but worshiped night and day with fasting and prayer.  38 And coming forward at that very time, she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were awaiting the redemption of Jerusalem.

The proclamation of the Gospel has begun.  Simeon the prophet and Anna the prophetess have recognized the Messiah and have begun to announce His coming to His people.  This is the third righteous man/woman combination in the birth narrative:

  1. Zechariah and Elizabeth
  2. Mary and Joseph
  3. Simeon and Anna. 

God has always used righteous men and women to move forward His plan for mankind's salvation.

Luke 2:39-40 ~ The Holy Family returns to Nazareth
39 When they had fulfilled all the prescriptions of the law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee, to their own town of Nazareth.  40 The child grew and became strong, filled with wisdom and the favor of God was upon him.
Throughout salvation history, God has invited men and women to take part in His divine plan to bring salvation to mankind.  Today you are reminded that you also have a role to play as a part of the Church's "faithful remnant" (see teaching on the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time cycle A), serving as Jesus' true disciples in proclaiming His message of redemption and salvation to the world.   Don't miss the opportunity to serve as St. John served our Lord in humility and "poverty of spirit" (as opposed to a prideful and rebellious spirit), submitting your life to the service of your Lord and Savior through His Church which is His vehicle for man's salvation.

Catechism References:
Malachi 3:1-4 (CCC 678, 1040-41)
Psalm 24:7-10 (CCC 559), 24:8-10 (CCC 269), 24:9 (CCC 2628)
Hebrews 2:14-15 (CCC 635), 2:14 (CCC 407, 636), 2:15 (1520, 2602), 2:17-18 (CCC 609)
Luke 2:22-39 (CCC 529, 583), 2:25 (CCC 711), 2:26-27 (CCC 695), 2:32 (CCC 713), 2:23 (CCC 575, 587), 2:35 (CCC 149, 618), 2:38 (CCC 711)

Michal E. Hunt Copyright © 2014